About DARU

DARU is unique in Australia as a dedicated resource unit funded to work with disability advocacy organisations to promote and protect the rights of people with disability. We develop and distribute resources and provide training opportunities to keep disability advocates informed and up-to-date about issues affecting people with disability in Victoria. DARU also hosts regular professional development events including;

dialogue speech bubbles icon  Advocacy Sector Conversations forum series and

flame icon colour  Strengthening Disability Advocacy Conference

 

DARU Update

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Find an Advocate

Directory of organisations for agencies delivering disability advocacy as well as complaints bodies, campaigners, support groups and useful referral and information services.

Find an advocate

What is disability advocacy?

Info sheet with overview of advocacy  types, what disability advocates do, why we need advocacy, shifting social models and how advocacy is funded in Victoria.

Find out more

In the news

  • Cops accuse five of fleecing disabled of $1.1m

    Federal police say they will hunt down offenders involved in ­“despicable” scams on people with disabilities, after busting an ­alleged organised crime syndicate suspected of defrauding the ­National Disability Insurance Scheme.

  • Huge financial and social benefits to inclusive design, report shows

    Commissioned by the Centre for Inclusive Design in partnership with Adobe and Microsoft, the report shows designing products and services with the needs of people experiencing the effects of ageing, poverty and disability in mind can reach four times as many consumers as opposed to not doing so.

  • Disabled People Don’t Need To Be “Fixed” — We Need A Cure For Ableism

    There’s a common assumption that people with disabilities all have a desire to or need to be cured. The idea of needing to “fix” or “cure” disability communities automatically assumes a negative relationship between people and their disabilities. It also perpetuates the misconception that disability is something to be ashamed of.

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