Resources

Overview of responses to the Safeguards and quality Issues paper –

Respondents proposed a raft of changes for the Royal Commission to consider including The lack of focus on prevention of abuse and neglect of people with disability and the need to identify the factors that potentially place individuals at higher risk of abuse. The importance of creating a service culture amongst disability service providers and support workers that respects human rights and does not tolerate violence or other abuses was also highlighted.

Disability Royal Commission welcomes new law to protect confidential information

Legislation has passed the Australian parliament today to protect confidential information provided to a Royal Commission beyond the life of the Royal Commission. Chair of the Royal Commission into Violence, Abuse, Neglect and Exploitation of People with Disability, the Hon Ronald Sackville AO QC, has welcomed the passage of the Royal Commissions Amendment (Protection of Information) Bill 2021.

Rapid Evidence Review: Violence, abuse, neglect and exploitation of people with disability

The report examines existing research to gain a better understanding of both risk and protective factors relating to why some members of society cause harm to people with disability. A rapid review process was used to identify 168 papers in the peer-reviewed literature. The researchers found that the majority of studies focused on the risks for people with disability while only few looked at the risk factors which enable perpetrators, or systemic issues that enable violence.

Stronger privacy protections for disability royal commission

Disability advocates are welcoming strengthened privacy protections for people who testify at the Royal Commission into Violence, Abuse, Neglect and Exploitation of People with Disability. New legislation will protect the identity of those who make written submissions to the Royal Commission even after the final report is delivered.

Legislation and regulation in Australia: Children and young people with disability in primary and secondary education settings’.

The report provides a general description of how Commonwealth funding for education operates; a detailed explanation of how laws regulating education for students with disability function in each jurisdiction; and an examination of each jurisdiction’s anti-discrimination laws as they apply to education (including the Disability Discrimination Act 1992 (Cth) and the Disability Standards for Education 2005 issued under that Act.)

Psychotropic medication, behaviour support and behaviours of concern

The report analyses and summarises the evidence presented during public hearing 6.  It suggests that psychotropic medication, which are drugs that affect a person’s mind, emotions or behaviour, is being over-prescribed to people with cognitive disability to deal with what are commonly described as ‘behaviours of concern’. Medical evidence along with observations from family and carers indicate people with cognitive disability often experience serious negative consequences from using psychotropic medication And there is not much evidence to support the effectiveness of psychotropic medication as a way to address behaviours of concern

Disability groups welcome royal commission extension

The Morrison government has announced it is extending the Royal Commission into Violence, Abuse, Neglect and Exploitation of People with Disability by 17 months, following strong campaigning from the sector.

Overview of responses to the Rights and attitudes Issues paper

People with disability are often called ‘inferior’, ‘a burden’, or ‘a menace’. They say people assume they are ‘of no value’, ‘not fully human’, ‘objects of pity’, ‘eternal children’ or ‘better off dead’. Many respondents talked about the long term harm such language can have and how this language reflects the ingrained attitudes and discrimination which still exists in Australia towards people with disability.

Our Royal Commission: We need more time to tell our stories

Closing date: June 30, 2021

People with disability experience violence, abuse, neglect and exploitation at highly disproportionate rates, and our voices must be heard. The Hon. Ronald Sackville, Chair of the Disability Royal Commission, has requested a 17-month extension. People withDisability Australia support this call, and we ask you to do the same by writing to the Attorney-General, Michaelia Cash. You can use our sample letter, or edit as you like.

Summary of responses to restrictive practice issues paper

Restrictive practices limit a person’s rights or freedom of movement and come in various forms. Seclusion, such as locking someone in a room, using restraints like handcuffing someone to a bed or medicating someone to control their behaviour are all examples of restrictive practice. Respondents said restrictive practices can have negative effects on people with disability. This includes trauma, poor health, shorter lifespan and death. They said using restrictive practices can be degrading and cruel. Their use can create a culture which does not value people with disability, and make denying them their rights seem normal.

Summary of responses to employment issues paper

Disability Employment Services (DES) were singled out and concerns were raised about their design and implementation.  Some responses said the very service that was established to help people with disability find and keep a job, is falling far short of what it was set up to do. Responders described how some DES consultants didn’t have specialised disability knowledge or qualifications, and didn’t act in their client’s best interest.