Resources

Calendar of planned events January – June 2020

The Commission has released planned community events, public hearings and cohort specific engagements up until June 2020. The schedule is subject to change and more events will be confirmed at a later date.

Transcripts from melbourne Hearing on Housing

Transcripts are available for the hearing into homes and living for people with disability in Victoria with particular interest in the experiences of people who have lived or are currently living in group homes. This hearing took place in Melbourne during the first week of December 2019.

Have your say on health care for people with cognitive disability

Closing date: March 20, 2020

The Royal Commission wants to understand the experiences of people with cognitive disability in accessing or receiving health care. Health is a key issue for the Royal Commission because people with disability may experience violence, abuse, neglect and exploitation in health settings. The denial of the right to health care may also be a form of neglect. Access to, and treatment of, people with cognitive disability in the health system will be the subject of the first hearing in February 2020.

Group homes dehumanise and unjustly punish people with disabilities, royal commission hears

Disability and Community Inclusion professor Sally Robinson told the inquiry residents in group homes were being treated in ways that would not be acceptable for other people. “Residents are expected to be compliant, they’re expected to not know very much about their right to complain … They’re expected to endure it,” she told the commission.

Accessibility & Inclusion Strategy

The Strategy outlines the principles that will guide the Royal Commission in its engagement with people with disability. It commits the Royal Commission to putting people with disability first in everything we do and explains how we will achieve this. The Strategy was released in draft form for public consultation in August. This version reflects feedback we received from the community.

Deep scars from abuse in disability homes

“My daughter is fearful of everything, she’s had so much abuse,” the mother, referred to as Ms G, told a hearing in Melbourne on Monday. “She didn’t ask to be born with the problems she’s got, but as a result of what she’s been through in the system, she is a very damaged person.”

No outrage over disability restraints use

Dr Spivakovsky questioned the lack of public outrage over the use of what many researchers and activists call “disability-specific lawful violence”.

Disabled voices heard at royal commission

“I have found the move into supported accommodation resulted in extreme loss of control of my life,” Dr Gibilisco told the disability royal commission on Monday. “I have found it to be a loss to my way of life in a personal and social sense.”

What do the royal commissions reveal about us as a society?

It’s important that as a nation we acknowledge the many lives that have been impacted by these terrible stories and do all we can to ensure they don’t happen again. One way of doing this is by taking a step back and asking why we have needed three royal commissions into vulnerable people in our society in such quick succession. 

Homes and Living: Group Homes Issues Paper

Closing date: February 28, 2020

The Royal Commission is interested in the experiences of people with disability who have lived, or who are living in group homes. It was expected that the group home model would provide people with disability with more independence and meaningful life choices. However, some advocates claim that people with disability living in group homes experience exclusion and isolation, have less choice and control over their lives, and face an increased risk of violence, abuse, neglect and exploitation.

DRC Jargon Buster

Disability Royal Commission hearings sometimes use terms that most Australians aren’t very familiar with. The ‘Jargon Buster’ is a list of these explained in plain language.