Resources

It’s the socially created barriers that disable students, not the conditions they live with

The ways educators orientate to disability is crucial to how they ensure students are not excluded from any aspect of educational participation because of the conditions they live with. An educator’s orientation to disability is also just as important when they are designing and delivering inclusive curriculum. Unfortunately, still too many students with disabilities receive inequitable schooling opportunities in Australia.

Dylan Alcott says he missed out on childhood friends. With support, disabled kids today can have a better shot socially

School is a crucial place to think about friendships for kids with disabilities because, as research confirms, it’s a space where all kids learn to make and maintain friendships. Some studies imply that schooling plays an even more important social role for students with a disability than for typically developing kids – with non-disabled students modelling appropriate behaviours.

Disability Inclusion Profile

The Disability Inclusion Profile and surrounding process is designed to helps schools and families identify the strengths, functional needs, and educational adjustments schools can make to assist students with disability and additional learning needs.  The profile is part of a broader package to strengthen inclusive education across the school system including the expectation that schools must make reasonable adjustments to ensure that students with disability can access and participate in education on the same basis as students without disability, regardless of the availability of additional funding.

First chancellor with acknowledged disability to fight ‘attitude problem’

Australia’s first university chancellor who identifies as having a disability says things have improved since the days when his law studies revolved around whatever resources he could obtain in Braille or reel-to-reel audio tape. “I had a smaller range of material,” said lawyer and disability advocate Graeme Innes, who was born blind. “My challenge was that I had to know that material better than other students who could research more broadly than I could.”

CRPD requires segregated education to be phased out: Expert opinion for Disability Royal Commission rejects Australian Government’s position

The bottom line of that analysis is although … a contested issue, my own view is the better view of the Convention’s obligation, in particular Article 24, is that Australia needs to move progressively over some time to have [a] transformed system with inclusive education, which does not, as a matter of principle, include special schools as a long-term separate form of education. And I think that is also a position taken by the CRPD Committee.”

Women with disabilities ‘underestimated’ as battle for equality in science careers heats up

In 2022, people with disabilities made up just 6.3 per cent of university enrolments in Australia, and only 1.2 per cent had a profound disability. Of those, only a handful studied science. Geologist and lecturer Melanie Finch believes the lack of inclusion in geoscience is an attitude problem rather than a lack of opportunities for disabled academics.

With the right support, all schools can be ‘special’ and inclusive

If you asked me at the time, I would have gladly skipped school and played video games instead. And yet, I did learn. I learnt how to spell, write, to do maths, languages, chemistry and drama. More importantly, I learnt soft skills. I made friends, navigated social cliques, traded lunchbox snacks, was teased, teased others, took risks and learnt from them, avoided girls then later discovered they weren’t so bad after all.