Resources

What do the royal commissions reveal about us as a society?

It’s important that as a nation we acknowledge the many lives that have been impacted by these terrible stories and do all we can to ensure they don’t happen again. One way of doing this is by taking a step back and asking why we have needed three royal commissions into vulnerable people in our society in such quick succession. 

Homes and Living: Group Homes Issues Paper

Closing date: February 28, 2020

The Royal Commission is interested in the experiences of people with disability who have lived, or who are living in group homes. It was expected that the group home model would provide people with disability with more independence and meaningful life choices. However, some advocates claim that people with disability living in group homes experience exclusion and isolation, have less choice and control over their lives, and face an increased risk of violence, abuse, neglect and exploitation.

DRC Jargon Buster

Disability Royal Commission hearings sometimes use terms that most Australians aren’t very familiar with. The ‘Jargon Buster’ is a list of these explained in plain language.

Our royal commission is not yet a safe place for people with disability

In summary, the information provided about the process is scant, legalistic and unclear; the counselling service is limited and difficult to access; and there appears to be a lack of awareness and empathy for those of us who have found the courage to share our stories.

Teachers fail to cater to disabled kids

Some teachers are “resisting diversity” in their classrooms and failing to cater for disabled students, the disability royal commission has been told. Special education teachers say despite some students having “complex needs”, there is no reason they cannot attend and thrive in mainstream schools.

Disability inquiry in Qld told of bullying

Counsel assisting Kerri Mellifont said some disabled students are subject to violence and bullying so severe they are forced to withdraw from the mainstream school system. “Those submissions and information start to paint the very real and stark picture that in many places persons with disabilities are not receiving equity in their education,” Dr Mellifont said.

Have your say on the Disability Royal Commission Education Issues Paper

Closing date: December 20, 2019

The Royal Commission issues paper on education outlines the Commission’s preliminary understanding of the key issues and barriers experienced by students with disability and asks 13 questions.  The Royal Commission is encouraging responses from individuals and organisations to the issues paper by 20 December 2019 (although submissions will be accepted after that date).